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Alcoholism affects nearly 25% of American adults under 30, says study
Posted in Alcohol

It’s well-known that Americans love alcohol. However, their love for drinking has crossed limits, resulting in a major part of the population suffering from alcoholism. A new study, published online in the journal JAMA Psychiatry in August 2017, suggests that roughly 25 percent of American adults aged under 30 years are diagnosed with alcohol use disorder (AUD) in a given year.

A group of researchers analyzed drinking patterns of around 40,000 people between 2002 and 2003, and again from 2012 to 2013 to infer their habits. The study, titled “Prevalence of 12-Month Alcohol Use, High-Risk Drinking, and DSM-IV Alcohol Use Disorder in the United States, 2001-2002 to 2012-2013: Results From the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions” revealed that an estimated one out of every eight Americans showed symptoms of alcoholism.

The researchers based their findings after a detailed examination of the study carried out by the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) in conjunction with the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The data was obtained post face-to-face interviews with participants of two nationwide surveys of American adults, including 43,093 respondents of NESARC and 36,309 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions III.

Evaluation of the details showed how alcoholism rates had gone up among men. The results showed that indulgence in drinking had gone up by 16.7 percent among American men, 16.6 percent among Native Americans and 14.3 percent among those who were economically weak. Elucidating the sharp spike in alcohol use among Americans, lead author of the study Bridget Grant, an NIH researcher said, “I think the increases are due to stress and despair and the use of alcohol as a coping mechanism.”

The country’s struggle with high-drinking rates among its population is not new. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), in 2015, approximately 27 percent of American adults reported that they had been binge drinking during the previous month, while 7 percent reported to have engaged in heavy alcohol use.

As per the statistics of the 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), more than 15 million American adults aged 18 years and above had exhibited symptoms of AUD. They include roughly 10 million men and 5.3 million women. In addition, nearly 37,000 adolescents had received treatment to seek recovery from their alcohol problems in 2015 alone.

Road to recovery

The problem of alcoholism, no matter how acute, can be dealt with by informing and educating people about the adverse effects of excessive drinking habits. There is an ardent need to reach out to more and more individuals with updated information available about alcohol abuse and pervasiveness of AUD across all age groups and encourage them to seek timely treatment in case of dependence.

It takes a lot of courage and determination to say “no” to alcohol. The problem with most people suffering from alcoholism is that they do not realize they are hooked to the effects of alcohol and hence need treatment. Saying “yes” to treatment aimed at recovery is the first step against the alcohol abuse. Sovereign Health of Texas understands the plight of someone suffering from addiction to any kind of harmful substances, including alcohol. Experts working at our alcohol rehab centers provide evidence-based treatment to patients in accordance with their needs. You may contact our 24/7 helpline or chat online with one of our representatives to learn more about our centers providing alcoholism treatment program in Texas.

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